Little Steps

Ask me anything   Things learned along the way.

twitter.com/robbiemelvin:

    Neil Patrick Harris Choose Your Own Auto - Neil Patrick Harris - McNally Robinson Booksellers →

    someone had to do it… of course it would be Doogie Howser, MD.  

    I feel bad for you if you don’t get that reference.

    — 7 hours ago
    #choose your own adventure 
    My mother coded in the 80’s.  We had a computer in our home from the time I was 9 years old… I immediately started coding.  That was 30 years ago.
So why is it more strange that I am a Computer Scientist with years of coding and analysis experience now… than it was weird that I was a 9 year old who could write little graphics programs in the 80s?  
Why is it that when I walk into the Comp Sci department office  at the university I get little weird looks from (male) people in the waiting room?
What happened in the last 15 years?

fastcompany:

In the 1960s women made up about 50 of all computer programmers, so what happened?
Since her 20-year-old daughter told her she was dropping her computer science major in college, Robin Hauser Reynolds has made it her mission to understand why the coding industry can be so unwelcoming to women.
Why is it that while 37% of U.S. college computer science grads in 1985 were women, today only 17% are?
Reynolds has talked to women coders, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, and people working inside some of the biggest tech companies in Silicon Valley, looking for answers. The result is a documentary film, CODE, that recently raised more than $86,000 through an Indiegogo campaign.
Reynolds and the films coproducer, Staci Hartman, who also has a daughter in her 20s working in the tech industry, were driven by more than just personal connections. As they started investigating, the data they came across suggested this was more than just a women’s issue.
The figure to convince them: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs and only 400,000 computer scientists to fill them. “That’s a million unfilled jobs,” says Reynolds.
Why aren’t women getting more involved in an industry where the need and growth potential is so great?
Read More>

    My mother coded in the 80’s.  We had a computer in our home from the time I was 9 years old… I immediately started coding.  That was 30 years ago.

    So why is it more strange that I am a Computer Scientist with years of coding and analysis experience now… than it was weird that I was a 9 year old who could write little graphics programs in the 80s?  

    Why is it that when I walk into the Comp Sci department office  at the university I get little weird looks from (male) people in the waiting room?

    What happened in the last 15 years?

    fastcompany:

    In the 1960s women made up about 50 of all computer programmers, so what happened?

    Since her 20-year-old daughter told her she was dropping her computer science major in college, Robin Hauser Reynolds has made it her mission to understand why the coding industry can be so unwelcoming to women.

    Why is it that while 37% of U.S. college computer science grads in 1985 were women, today only 17% are?

    Reynolds has talked to women coders, historians, neuroscientists, psychologists, and people working inside some of the biggest tech companies in Silicon Valley, looking for answers. The result is a documentary film, CODE, that recently raised more than $86,000 through an Indiegogo campaign.

    Reynolds and the films coproducer, Staci Hartman, who also has a daughter in her 20s working in the tech industry, were driven by more than just personal connections. As they started investigating, the data they came across suggested this was more than just a women’s issue.

    The figure to convince them: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer science jobs and only 400,000 computer scientists to fill them. “That’s a million unfilled jobs,” says Reynolds.

    Why aren’t women getting more involved in an industry where the need and growth potential is so great?

    Read More>

    — 8 hours ago with 65 notes

    jtotheizzoe:

    biomorphosis:

    When you flip bats upside down they become exceptionally sassy dancers [x].

    I have been laughing at this for at least 5 minutes straight.

    Chiroptera choreography!

    This is totally freaking me out!

    — 19 hours ago with 267913 notes
    The top drawer

    So my husband is looking for his copy of Civ 4 on disk.  We’ve looked everywhere we can think of (finding all kinds of software and dozens of disks full of photos from the early 2000’s).  

    He wondered if it might be in the dresser in the hallway…

    Husband:  Would it be in here or is this all shoes.

    Me:  oh it might be, the top drawer has computers.  

    We have a drawer in our house with old broken laptops in it.  

    — 1 day ago
    #so many computers from so many eras 

    What is Fiction? (ft. War of the Worlds) | Idea Channel | PBS Digital St…

    Helpful in understanding object oriented programming?

    (Source: youtube.com)

    — 1 week ago

    meretricula:

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS

    YOUUUUUUUUUUUUU

    WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIISH

    Ryan and I watched Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy on Friday night when his big brother and Dad were at camp.  I only realized after he went to bed that… WE SHOULD HAVE WATCHED THE PRINCES BRIDE.

    (I mean Hitchhikers was alright but Princes Bride is always awesome)

    (Source: lolgifs.net, via zohbugg)

    — 2 weeks ago with 124494 notes
    oupacademic:

Do you know your bumper from your boot? Or your loo form your living room? Test your knowledge of British English with our quiz!
Image: Flag - Union Flag by Vaughan Leiberum. CC-BY-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

John told us about a book they’re reading in his G7 class.  It is by a British author and whenever something like loo shows up in the text the teacher calls out ‘British Alert, British Alert’ and the class analyzes the word and context to figure out what the word means.
I like this teacher more and more every single day.

    oupacademic:

    Do you know your bumper from your boot? Or your loo form your living room? Test your knowledge of British English with our quiz!

    Image: Flag - Union Flag by Vaughan Leiberum. CC-BY-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

    John told us about a book they’re reading in his G7 class.  It is by a British author and whenever something like loo shows up in the text the teacher calls out ‘British Alert, British Alert’ and the class analyzes the word and context to figure out what the word means.

    I like this teacher more and more every single day.

    — 2 weeks ago with 70 notes
    #awesome teacher  #british english  #Canadian classroom 
    libutron:

Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia
Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.
Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

    libutron:

    Large-leaf Grass of Parnassus - Parnassia grandifolia

    Despite its common name, Parnassia grandifolia (Celastrales - Celastraceae) is not a grass, but a perennial herb, forming clusters of slightly succulent, shiny leaves. Its large, white flowers with green veins and bright orange anthers are really beautiful.

    Parnassia grandifolia is native to central and south eastern US. It grows in alkaline seeps and is an indicator of rich, old forest. 

    References: [1]

    Photo credit: ©Alan Cressler | Locality: Ocala National Forest, Marion Co., Florida, US (2010)

    (via somuchscience)

    — 2 weeks ago with 5954 notes
    #lovely 
    "How do you kill one million zombies? Kill one zombie, then kill the rest of the zombies."
    Explaining Induction (via mathprofessorquotes)
    — 2 weeks ago with 380 notes